Zero 2 Infinity wants to send tourists to space using a giant hot air balloon for just $132,000

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A number of space companies are developing rockets to be the first to send tourists into orbit, but the latest new comer to race plans to do so with a massive balloon


A number of space companies are developing rockets to be the first to send tourists into orbit, but the latest new comer to race plans to do so with a massive balloon.

Spanish startup Zero 2 Infinity plans to float civilians some 130,000 feet above the surface using a helium balloon measuring 420 feet in diameter.

The entire journey would lasts for six hours –three hours for decent, an hour in space and one to come back to Earth.

Zero 2 Infinity has been working on the idea since being founded in 2009, but is getting closer to opening tickets sales to the public  for $132,483 – other companies are charging no less than $250,000.

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A number of space companies are developing rockets to be the first to send tourists into orbit, but the latest new comer to race plans to do so with a massive balloon

Elon Musk’s SpaceX and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin both have their sights set on space tourism and have made major headway in the market.

However, none have actually been successful, which leaves room for other companies to join the race.

Zero 2 Infinity conducted its first test in 2012 by sending a humanoid inside the capsule attached to the balloon and let it float up into orbit, Business Insider reports.

Then five years later, the firm deployed its first prototype called ‘Bloostar,’ which was a two-stage craft consisting of a balloon and rocket.

Spanish startup Zero 2 Infinity plans to float civilians some 130,000 feet above the surface using a helium balloon measuring 420 feet in diameter

Spanish startup Zero 2 Infinity plans to float civilians some 130,000 feet above the surface using a helium balloon measuring 420 feet in diameter

The balloon successfully carried the rocket up to the altitude mark, where it was able to ignite its engines allowing it to float in space.

CEO Jose Mariano Lopez-Urdiales told El Economista: ‘We have the capsule, the permits, the insurance, the stratoport. What is missing is a purely question of financing.’

‘Spain has everything to be a leader in space tourism: it has the companies and the technology.’

Passengers will be given two days safety training and be served their favorite meal while aboard.

Zero 2 Infinity has been working on the idea since being founded in 2009, but is getting closer to opening tickets sales to the public for $132,483 – other companies are charging no less than $250,000

Zero 2 Infinity has been working on the idea since being founded in 2009, but is getting closer to opening tickets sales to the public for $132,483 – other companies are charging no less than $250,000

Passengers will be given two days safety training and be served their favorite meal while aboard

Passengers will be given two days safety training and be served their favorite meal while aboard

Scientific experiments will also be carried out, including measuring the atmosphere and levels of pollution prior to each launch.

Zero 2 Infinity is not the only company looking to use balloons as the propeller to space.

Space Perspective announced in June that it is develop its Spaceship Neptune’ that holds nine people and a mini bar, all of which will be encased in large windows.

The startup plans to launch tourists 10,000 feet into the stratosphere inside a pressurized capsule attached to a massive balloon.

Musk's SpaceX has already signed up three civilians for a trip to the International Space Station who are willing to pay $55 million each

Musk’s SpaceX has already signed up three civilians for a trip to the International Space Station who are willing to pay $55 million each

Blue Origin is also planning to take adventures to the final frontier, but these trips would only last for a few hours and cost around $200,000

Blue Origin is also planning to take adventures to the final frontier, but these trips would only last for a few hours and cost around $200,000

Unmanned test flights are set to begin in early 2021 and the firm hopes to sell tickets starting in 2024 for $125,000, which is more than $10,000 cheaper than Zero 2 Infinity.

However, it may be interesting to see how the cheaper alternatives will stand up to the powerhouses in the space.

Musk’s SpaceX has already signed up three civilians for a trip to the International Space Station who are willing to pay $55 million each.

Blue Origin is also planning to take adventures to the final frontier, but these trips would only last for a few hours and cost around $200,000.



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